By GAFM ® Management & Finance Certification ®
    chartered wealth manager accredited financial analyst financial planner ISO 9001 Accredited Certification Body Training
International Board of Standards - Professional Designations -  Accredited Education.  Creating the World's Leaders in Management ™

<< Previous    1...   14  15  [16]  17  18  ...91    Next >>

Here are some kinds of investments you may consider making: 

  

Stocks and Bonds   

Many companies offer investors the opportunity to buy either stocks or bonds. The following example shows you how stocks and bonds differ. 

Let’s say you believe that a company that makes automobiles may be a good investment. Everyone you know is buying one of its cars, and your friends report that the company’s cars rarely break down and run well for years. You either have an investment professional investigate the company and read as much as possible about it, or you do it yourself. 

 

 

After your research, you’re convinced it’s a solid company that will sell many more cars in the years ahead. The automobile company offers both stocks and bonds. With the bonds, the company agrees to pay you back your initial investment in ten years, plus pay you interest twice a year at the rate of 8% a year. 

If you buy the stock, you take on the risk of potentially losing a portion or all of your initial investment if the company does poorly or the stock market drops in value. But you also may see the stock increase in value beyond what you could earn from the bonds. If you buy the stock, you become an “owner” of the company. 

You wrestle with the decision. If you buy the bonds, you will get your money back plus the 8% interest a year. And you think the company will be able to honor its promise to you on the bonds because it has been in business for many years and doesn’t look like it could go bankrupt. The company has a long history of making cars and you know that its stock has gone up in price by an average of 9% a year, plus it has typically paid stockholders a dividend of 3% from its profits each year. 

You take your time and make a careful decision. Only time will tell if you made the right choice. You’ll keep a close eye on the company and keep the stock as long as the company keeps selling a quality car that consumers want to drive, and it can make an acceptable profit from its sales. 

  

Mutual Funds   

Because it is sometimes hard for investors to become experts on various businesses—for example, what are the best steel, automobile, or telephone companies—investors often depend on professionals who are trained to investigate companies and recommend companies that are likely to succeed. 

Since it takes work to pick the stocks or bonds of the companies that have the best chance to do well in the future, many investors choose to invest in mutual funds. 

What is a mutual fund? 

A mutual fund is a pool of money run by a professional or group of professionals called the “investment adviser.” In a managed mutual fund, after investigating the prospects of many companies, the fund’s investment adviser will pick the stocks or bonds of companies and put them into a fund. Investors can buy shares of the fund, and their shares rise or fall in value as the values of the stocks and bonds in the fund rise and fall.  

Investors may typically pay a fee when they buy or sell their shares in the fund, and those fees in part pay the salaries and expenses of the professionals who manage the fund. 

Even small fees can and do add up and eat into a significant chunk of the returns a mutual fund is likely to produce, so you need to look carefully at how much a fund costs and think about how much it will cost you over the amount of time you plan to own its shares. If two funds are similar in every way except that one charges a higher fee than the other, you’ll make more money by choosing the fund with the lower annual costs.  

Mutual Funds Without Active Management 

One way that investors can obtain for themselves nearly the full returns of the market is to invest in an “index fund.” This is a mutual fund that does not attempt to pick and choose stocks of individual companies based upon the research of the mutual fund managers or to try to time the market’s movements. An index fund seeks to equal the returns of a major stock index, such as the Standard & Poor 500, the Wilshire 5000, or the Russell 3000. Through computer programmed buying and selling, an index fund tracks the holdings of a chosen index, and so shows the same returns as an index minus, of course, the annual fees involved in running the fund. The fees for index mutual funds generally are much lower than the fees for managed mutual funds. 

Historical data shows that index funds have, primarily because of their lower fees, enjoyed higher returns than the average managed mutual fund. But, like any investment, index funds involve risk. 

Watch "Turnover" to Avoid Paying Excess Taxes 

<< Previous    1...   14  15  [16]  17  18  ...91    Next >>

About GAFM ®

  

The GAFM International Board of Standards is TUV Accredited and ISO Certified for Quality and ISO 29990 Certified for Training Standards

 

● Home
● About
● Certifications
● Benefits
● Recognition
● Board
● Requirements
● Providers
● Events
● CWM Training Program
● News
● Articles
● Contact
● Application
● In House Training
● Speakers
● CEO Message
● Verify Member
● Qualifying Degrees
● Global Advisors
● Membership
● Mission
● Ethics
● Guides
● Handbook
● Financial Planner Program
● Chartered Economist
● CCO
● Higher Institute
● IP List
● Edevate
● Distribution
● Management Consulting Jobs
● AAPM
● TUV Accreditation
● Terms
● Deans Letter
● AFA Approved Masters Degrees
● Copy of Certification
● Economics Certification
● Economics Degrees
● Management Degrees
● Finance Degrees
● Accounting Degrees
● Exams
● Renew Certification
● Continuing Ed
● Trademarks
● CWM ® Chartered Wealth Manager ®

 

Validate and Verify Member Here

 

 TUV Accredited

 




 

Join our Linkedin Group

LinkedIn.com

 




 Accredited Certified Financial Analyst Chartered Accountant

Top Certifications and Designations

  • AFA Accredited Financial Analyst ®
  • AMA Accredited Management Accountant  ®
  • AMC Accredited Management Consultant  ®
  • CRA Certified Risk Analyst ®
  • MFP Master Finanical Planner
  • CTEP Chartered Trust & Estate Planner
  • CIPM Certified International Project Manager ®
  • MPM Master Project Manager ®

 

The GAFM ® Board is the 1st Graduate Certification Body to Become Accredited  and Certified for: ISO 9001 Quality and ISO 29990 Training in the World. GAFM ® owns the former AAFM ® Certifications and Programs

 



IP/Rights Global